Commonplacing: theory and practice

Locke's commonplace book

Locke

Above, Locke’s New method of a common-place-book, from the 1705 posthumous edition of his works (Beinecke call number K8 L79 a706); below, Osborn b192, the “anonymous manuscript, containing notes on reading, theology, heraldry, a Latin poem, a sermon and “For Free lending,” a dialogue, as well as financial figures.”

0 Responses to “Commonplacing: theory and practice”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s





%d bloggers like this: